The Emotional and Technical Guide to Rescue Stalled Software

When code gets complex, it’s not just about technique, but also mental preparation. Get ready to overcome your own limits!

David Rodenas PhD

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DALL·E 3 Generated image that reminds us to keep calm and guides us to the success.

You’ve been working on a software development for years. At the beginning, it was easy, you were moving quickly, but the good times have ended. You know you need to do something about it, and maybe you even consider asking to redo the software, but don’t do it. You can regain agility without redoing the software; it’s hard, it requires mental preparation, but today I will guide you on how to achieve it.

Index:

- The Golden Rule
- The First Step
- The Power of the Rabbit-hole
- First Danger: Loosing Focus (& the second golden rule)
- Learning on the Go
- The Right Mindset
- Overcoming the Fear of Breaking Everything
- Overcoming the Fear of Wasting Time
- Overcoming the Frankenstein Complex
- Overcoming the Fear of Not Being DRY
- Trying No-DRY and DDD Together
- Overcoming Challenges

The Golden Rule

In previous articles, I’ve been talking about the costs of either keeping the code clean or waiting for the inevitable moment to redo everything. We discussed the costs of each, what it entails, and we weighed up the best solution. Needless to say, it’s keeping the code clean. But what happens when you’re late? When it hasn’t been kept clean, and now almost all agility is lost? Well, there’s a way to continue.

But most importantly, whatever happens, we must bear in mind the first golden rule:

— First Golden Rule:

Never, ever redo a development.

Redoing software from scratch is too expensive and has too many associated costs to be a viable option. But of course, if we can’t redo it, and we hadn’t kept it clean, how can we regain agility?

Step by step.

The First Step.

There’s no need to redo the entire development to improve agility.

A development that has reached a state where the loss of speed is evident, to the point where we consider redoing it, is a

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David Rodenas PhD

Passionate software engineer & storyteller. Sharing knowledge to advance our skills. Join me on a journey of discovery in the world of software engineering.