Hi Pbrown,

I am uncertain if I understood correctly your comment. But after read another one, I believe that you have a very different understanding about what Agile and TDD are, and from where they origin.

Nowadays, Waterfall is the most prominent academic mythology applied across many disciplines. It assumes a subset of preconditions that rarely occur in real life. If you have a big budget, and a massive tolerance for failure (almost 70% waterfall projects do not succeed), you probably can afford that, but better to get ready to explain why you wasted so many resources during so long to your stakeholders. (More here)

But, unlike you seem to say, Agile and TDD practices (not theories) emerged from working professionals that wanted to improve the profession and the reputation of the profession. Even Winston Royce, often cited as the one who documented the Waterfall, said that the Waterfall did not work, and offered an alternative (limited by the thinking in his times) very close to the Waterfall. And the teachings in the university about Agile and TDD practices are often a joke, and the research, almost nonexisting, or completely irrelevant.

So, if I understood correctly your comment, why did you think that Agile and TDD come from the Academia? It is rather the opposite.

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I like to write stories about how we understand and apply software engineering, and to make us think about what we could improve.

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David Rodenas, Ph. D.

I like to write stories about how we understand and apply software engineering, and to make us think about what we could improve.